John Fairbairn1

(circa Oct 1865 - )
FatherJesse Fairbairn1 (circa 1834 - bet. Sep 1893 - Dec 1893)
MotherBridget Butler1 (circa 1849 - bet. Mar 1910 - Jun 1910)

BDMs

     John Fairbairn was born circa Oct 1865 St John's, NFD, CAN, 19 yrs 10 mths 6 Aug 1884.2
     John Fairbairn married Jane Parkinson on 18 Dec 1887 St Philips Ch, Par. of Litherland, LAN, ENG, cert. shows John as 22 soldier, s/o Jesse FAIRBAIRN, pensioner; Jane 21, d/o James PARKINSON, labourer; both resid. 32 Holmes Lane, both signed; Wit: Samuel SOUTHWARD, Margaret READY.3

Census

     John Fairbairn appeared on the census of 1891 Holmes Lane (32), Par. of Litherland, LAN, ENG, with Jane Parkinson, enumerated as PARKINSON: James 48 ag lab b. Litherland, LAN; wife Alice 48 b. Birkenhead, CHS; Children: James 22, William 18, Thomas 16 all ag labs b. ??, LAN; John 11, Harry 7, Margaret 2, all b. ??, LAN; Son-in-law FAIRBAIRN: John 22 b. CAN; dtr (FAIRBAIRN) Jane 4 b. Tranmere, CHS; Jessie 2 b. Cahir, IRL; Harry 1 b. Bradford, Yorkshire.4
     John Fairbairn appeared on the census of 1901 Litherland, LAN, ENG, with Jane Fairbairn, enumerated as FAIRBAIRN: John 34 insurance agent b. CAN; wife Jane 34 b. Tranmere, CHS; Children: Jessie 12 b. IRL; Henry 11 b. Bradford, Yorkshire; Ellen 9 b. Seaforth, LAN; Alice 7 b. Bradford, YKS; Mabel 4, Ada 11/12 both b. Seaforth; Father-in-law: PARKINSON: Jas 58 wid. farm lab b. Litherland, LAN; Bros-in-law (PARKINSON): James 30, Thomas 26 both bricklayers; Henry 16 tanners lab., Sis-in-law: Margaret 12, all b. Litherland, LAN.5

Links

     Click here to see John's page on WikiTree, a (free) collaborative on-line tree.6

Family

Jane Parkinson (circa 1866 - )
Children
  • Jessie Fairbairn4 (circa 1889 - )
  • Harry Fairbairn4 (circa 1890 - )
  • Ellen Fairbairn5 (circa 1892 - )
  • Alice Fairbairn5 (Nov 1893 - )
  • Mabel Fairbairn5 (Jun 1896 - )
  • Ada Fairbairn5 (circa Apr 1900 - )
  • Redvers Buller Fairbairn7 (bet. Jan 1902 - Mar 1902 - bet. Sep 1952 - Dec 1952)
ChartsLineage 1b4b: Robert and Elizabeth (CROSBIE) Fairbairn
John and Jane (Waddell) Fairbairn
Last Edited28 Feb 2016

Citations

  1. [S7] Ancestry.com - Family Trees online at http://search.ancestry.com, Family of John & Jane (PARKINSON) FAIRBAIRN, from corres. and tree of cmys16677, Jan 2016.
  2. [S7] Ancestry.com - Family Trees online at http://search.ancestry.com, Military record 1884 - 1896 John s/o Jesse FAIRBAIRN, copy on tree of cmys16677, examined Jan 2016.
  3. [S2153] Various, BDM Certified copy, Marr. 18 Dec 1887 John s/o Jesse FAIRBAIRN; Jane d/o James PARKINSON, St Philips Ch, Par. of Litherland, LAN, copy d/loaded from tree of cmys16677, Jan 2016.
  4. [S211] 1891 Census images, England & Wales, via Ancestry.com, Litherland, LAN, RG12/2984 4 Pg 38 Sched. 247, hsehold of James & Alice PARKINSON, extracted Jan 2016.
  5. [S213] 1901 Census images, England & Wales, via Ancestry.com, Litherland, West Derby, LAN, RG13; Piece: 3449; Folio: 90; Page: 26 Sched. 148, hsehold of John & Jane FAIRBIARN, extracted Jan 2016.
  6. [S3217] WikiTree online at http://WikiTree.com/, Feb 2016.
  7. [S215] 1911 Census images, ENG, http://www.findmypast.co.uk/CensusPersonStartSearchServlet , http://ancestry.com, Halifax, WRY, RG14_26456_0119, hsheold of Jane FAIRBAIRN, copy d/loaded Jan 2016.
 
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